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DCT 14 Feb links and prep

GDCoP

  • What key principle did you learn from participation in this COP?
  • What was the impact of the project for your students?

[See slideshare and individual reports on gdcop.wordpress.com for examples]

Lesley: What key principle did you learn from participation in this COP?

There is an increasing need for digital literacy[1] and multimodal fluency for both staff and students in today’s tertiary environment, to compliment traditional academic literacy. Universities are undergoing very rapid change and are under threat (“If universities don’t adapt, they will die” see address by Hon Lindsay Tanner, Vice-chancellors fellow Victoria University October, Will the internet kill the Universities, 2011). Here at AUT in Art and Design, the curriculum is changing to a minor/major structure next year and multimodal ability is key to be able to negotiate these developments in the new curriculum.  The key principal I learnt from participation in two COP’s was value of the collective learning experience and shared passion for new knowledge. CoP’s enabled multiple collaborations and sharing of knowledge, resulting in a very steep learning curve. In particular the CFLaT support [Stewards: Thom & Hohepa, and the technical support of the LATTE’s [Learning and teacher training enablers], Victorio and his team, and AUTonline team [Mahara] was brilliant and enabled curriculum development in terms of digital literacy. Also the sharing of collective knowledge with staff from the School of Communication [in MOBCOP] resulted invited guest lectures in our first year theory paper.

Anna Jackson prezi on Transmedia: http://prezi.com/ps9rfhpkl7fu/transmedia-social-media-intro/?auth_key=77d412ace531c50e8c81c83726c5535b652587c3

Geraldine Peters Prezi on intro to Blogging: http://prezi.com/cwgjmbqyij-r/mobcop-blog-intro/?res_nr=1&sis=6317400022)Also

Hohepa lecture on digital publishing P. 29 Slideshare. gdcop.wordpress.com

Last but not least in terms of shared knowledge, was the support of staff in  GD CoP that led to collaboration across papers and in all sorts of ways.   gdcop.wordpress.com enabling us  to integrate research and teaching. One of my research passions is the future of the book, and the COP participation has led to collaboration on research papers e.g. for the TEXT Journal in October 2013 etc.

Title and Abstrct: Shape-shifting: traditional book arts and 21st century multimodal book formats in tertiary teaching

Our relationship to books, both as objects and as texts, is mutating dramatically, not just for readers and writers, but also those who produce books. This paper explores how old and new technologies might be utilised in the bindery for the creation of multimodal books that combine prized aspects of printed limited edition or one-off hand-made books with the enhanced communication and reading potential of ebooks. Projects were set in the first and second year of a Bachelor of Design (Graphics) programme. Emerging theoretical contexts informed research into contemporary issues, theory and formats, and students presented their findings as beautifully designed bookworks that utilised both text and image. They were also required/invited to design the content as an interactive PDF or EPUB to be read in an iBooks library on an iPad/iPhone. “This is a strategically important direction in tertiary design education, as book production needs to be guided by sound aesthetic and design principles”[2] as the book morphs into the future. Students were empowered with a multi-modal fluency that prepares them for their future professional and personal lives as designers and creators.

Lesley: What was the impact of the project for your students?

Students were empowered with a multi-modal fluency that prepares them for their future professional and personal lives as designers and creators

They produced 120+ excellent multimodal books with both print and iPad versions.

See examples and student feedback section pp. 35-36 of slideshare: www.lesleykaiser.wordpress.com

www.gdcop.wordpress.com

STUDENT FEEDBACK: Student Feedback was excellent overall, and project seen as good industry preparation

“I have learnt so much. The interactive PDF for the Bookworks was a challenge but I did it and have submitted. It is such an awesome tool to have learnt for the future. First year of Uni over, looking forward to the break but also looking forward to coming back! “ (KR)

Over 100 students (first-year BDes Graphics) produced books for the iBooks library on iPhone/iPads. Students could check their ebooks on their smart phones. 55 of 89 students giving (SEPS) paper feedback wanted to continue the digital literacy initiative with iPads/mobile technologies in the second year. More students are likely to have iPads/smart phones as each year passes.

James Smith short clip: http://db.tt/02TDjf1d

Full presentation:http://db.tt/8yf9QiDM

Julia Telford-Brown short clip: http://db.tt/ftvueuqZ

Full presentation: http://db.tt/1SHseKXc

Marina Eichhorn downloadable interactive pdf as epub: http://db.tt/yE3qcm3l

The effects of web 2.0 on communication, Advertising and Graphic Design

Presentation: http://db.tt/dzxrD0ZG

Varnia Carter presentation: http://db.tt/AfHO6fZV

Curriculum development: Building in epublication and social media to new minors (eg Alternative narratives). Developing multimodal books into second year teaching in terms of the future of the book.

Key to maintaining a studio culture is learning to use all the advantages of digital technology to enhance and compliment traditional skills and craft-based learning. This way our practice-based learning courses can flourish

Logan:

Key Principles Learnt from iPad CoP

Q. What is it?   A. Mobile App carrier

Enables students to utilise spacific tools at a very low cost.

When do I use it over/instead of my iphone?

Quality and size of the screen

Touch screen navigation

Apps specific to Motion graphics and stop frame animation

Impact of the project for the students

Introduces students to new mobile tools in the form of Apps

Provides a new platform in which to design and view onscreen publications

Provides currency about new technologies

Eden & Alan:

Integrating digital technology into productivity and workflow in
The Studio.

This project investigates a range of digital productivity apps and tools that are concerned with workflow and design studio management. A key aim is to increase the digital literacy of students who work in the communication design studio, and to encourage their adoption and development of online digital tools. A secondary aim is to facilitate a studio environment that is integrated, networked, and more environmentally sustainable (by reducing paper waste).

Following on from this stage of the research, a student who completed The Studio PG Diploma is undertaking her Masters this year, specialising in social media tools for communication design.

[1] Wikipedia: Digital literacy is the ability to effectively and critically navigate, evaluate and create information using a range of digital technologies. It requires one “to recognize and use that power, to manipulate and transform digital media, to distribute pervasively, and to easily adapt them to new forms”.[1] Digital literacy does not replace traditional forms of literacy, it builds upon the foundation of traditional forms of literacy.[2] Digital literacy is the marrying of the two terms digital and literacy, however, it is much more than a combination of the two terms. Digital information is a symbolic representation of data, and literacy refers to the ability to read for knowledge, write coherently, and think critically about the written word.Research around digital literacy is concerned with wider aspects associated with learning how to effectively find, use, summarize, evaluate, create, and communicate information while using digital technologies; not just being literate at using a computer.Digital literacy encompasses all digital devices, such as computer hardware, software, the Internet, and cell phones. A person using these skills to interact with society may be called a digital citizen.

[2] Dr Stanley Frielick, AUT Center for Learning and Teaching

From Thom

Hi Team

For the DCT Forum, we have a 2 hour slot – I’d like this to be an interactive ‘conversation’ with the audience – as we did at the Ascilite Symposium. The focus is upon the impact of the community of practice approach.

I’ll have Airplay setup on AUT-TEST for you all to mirror your iPhone/iPad screens to demo your project activities – please BYO devices! Demo the use of the tools we used – i.e. do not show a powerpoint presentation about your project!

My overview notes are on a shared Evernote at: http://tinyurl.com/c8x2xto

I’ll introduce you all and quickly overview our COP framework for the projects

You can then introduce your team members – it might be best if they sat in with the audience, and only have the team leaders up front.

I’ll get Richard Pamatatau to ‘interview’ you each on:

  • What key principle did you learn from participation in this COP?
  • What was the impact of the project for your students?

We’ll then open it up for questions from the audience and hopefully be just as engaged as we were at Ascilite 🙂

I’ll get Vickel to run a TodaysMeet online feedback stream during the presentation/discussion

How’s that for a plan?

Thom.

Dr Thomas Cochrane

BE, BD, GDHE, MTS, MComp, PHD (Monash)

Academic Advisor (elearning & Learning Technologies)

AUT

+6421 607883

http://bit.ly/MobileWeb20

http://bit.ly/thomcochrane

http://thomcochrane.wikispaces.com


Curriculum Leadership: An electronic journal for leaders in education

IssueVolume 8 Issue 16 >  Articles

Helping teachers to explore multimodal texts

Michèle Anstey
Geoff Bull

The authors are co-directors of Anstey & Bull Consultants in Education (www.ansteybull.com)Michèle Anstey is a former Associate Professor at the University of Southern Queensland, where she was Deputy Dean of the Faculty of Education. Geoff Bull is a former Associate Professor at the University of Southern Queensland where he was a Program Head and taught undergraduate and postgraduate courses in literacy and literature. He is a former national president of the Australian Literacy Educators’ Association.

Current definitions of literacy frequently refer to multimedia and multimodal texts. There are references to such materials throughout the Australian Curriculum: English Draft Version 1.0.1, which defines literacy in the following way:

In the 21st century, the definition of literacy has expanded to refer to a flexible, sustainable command of a set of capabilities in the use and production of traditional texts and new communications technologies, using spoken language, print and multimedia. (p 5)

One of the six aims stated in the draft curriculum is that students will have the opportunity to ‘understand, interpret, reflect on and create an increasingly broad repertoire of spoken, written and multimodal texts across a growing range of settings’.

It is therefore timely to consider how teachers can become familiar with and confident in their use of multimodal texts in the classroom.
What are multimodal texts?

A text may be defined as multimodal when it combines two or more semiotic systems. There are five semiotic systems in total:

  1. Linguistic: comprising aspects such as vocabulary, generic structure and the grammar of oral and written language
  2. Visual: comprising aspects such as colour, vectors and viewpoint in still and moving images
  3. Audio: comprising aspects such as volume, pitch and rhythm of music and sound effects
  4. Gestural: comprising aspects such as movement, speed and stillness in facial expression and body language
  5. Spatial: comprising aspects such as proximity, direction, position of layout and organisation of objects in space.

Examples of multimodal texts are:

  • a picture book, in which the textual and visual elements are arranged on individual pages that contribute to an overall set of bound pages
  • a webpage, in which elements such as sound effects, oral language, written language, music and still or moving images are combined
  • a live ballet performance, in which gesture, music, and space are the main elements.

Multimodal texts can be delivered via different media or technologies. They may be live, paper, or digital electronic.
Helping teachers support students’ facility with multimodal texts

Based on our research, and the work we have conducted with teachers in Australia and New Zealand, we have identified six areas of professional learning of particular value for integrating multimodal texts into classroom practice.

1.    Knowledge and understanding about reading and writing multimodal texts that are delivered in different ways (paper, live and digital electronic).

Particular understandings about the design of multimodal texts support their effective classroom use. These include an understanding that texts perform a particular function over time or within a specific context, and they are designed to achieve particular communicative purposes. An understanding of a text’s purpose, audience and method of communication is key, as is an understanding of not only what is included in a text, but how different elements relate to each other, and the effect they are designed to achieve.

2.    Knowledge of the five semiotic systems of which a multimodal text can be composed.

Teachers and students need to understand the codes and conventions of each of the five semiotic systems in order to make or convey meaning through them. Therefore just as we now need to know and teach a linguistic grammar we must provide teachers and students with a grammar that enables them to select and use semiotic systems effectively in a multimodal text. For example, when composing a multi-modal text they will need to make decisions about whether to show a character’s emotions through sound, gesture, facial expression or descriptive words, or some combination of these.

3.    Metalanguage that facilitates the analysis, discussion and understanding of how multimodal texts work.

Metalanguage refers to the specialised terminology that describes how a multimodal text works. For example, the grammar for each of the five semiotic systems provides a metalanguage for discussing how they convey meaning.

4.    Explicit pedagogies that make the processes of reading and writing multimodal texts transparent.

Explicit pedagogy is functional and goal directed and ensures that teachers and students have a common understanding about the expectations and responsibilities of learning. In an explicit pedagogical approach, classroom interaction has particular characteristics and it is recognised that every literate practice in the classroom builds students’ understandings about what counts as literacy or literate practices.

5.    Ensure that the school has a balanced, school-wide approach to the teaching of literacy and multimodal texts.

It is essential that the school has mechanisms in place to assist teachers in maintaining a coherent approach to teaching with multimodal texts across all year levels in order to reinforce a common terminology for talking about texts and common understandings about them. A balance among the text types and the semiotic systems used must also be maintained. School curriculum plans and unit and lesson plans should be audited regularly to ensure balance and consistency.
Commencing the professional learning process

Teachers who are beginning to work with multimodal texts often associate them with technology, and may be reluctant to engage with them if they lack confidence with ICT. An excellent alternative for introducing the terminology, concepts and issues involved with multimodal text is via the picture book. This familiar example of multimodality, that is suitable for all year levels, can be used to examine and articulate the codes and conventions of the visual and linguistic semiotic systems.

Many of the codes relating to still images are common to those of moving images, so once confidence is achieved with picture books teachers can move on to film and video. A good place to start is with advertisements that, while short, provide all the characteristics of a multimodal text using audio, gestural, visual, linguistic and spatial semiotic systems. A great resource for advertisements is www.bestadsontv.com, from which material can be downloaded for a small fee.

Teachers who begin to engage with multimodal texts and more sophisticated technologies will find that their concepts about literacy, definitions of literacy and their literacy-related pedagogies are challenged; which can be confronting. When supporting teachers through this professional learning it is important to actively talk and learn about the change process as a topic in its own right, including how it affects us and how we can prepare ourselves for working through change. Teacher leaders can also work with teachers in identifying the types of challenges they might encounter and support mechanisms that will help them address and meet these challenges.
Further reading

For comment about the change process we recommend the works of Fullan, Calabrese and Hargreaves in the references below. Further information on explicit pedagogies that make the processes of reading and writing multimodal texts transparent is provided in Chapter six of our forthcoming book (Bull and Anstey 2010a). See also Cole and Pullen (2010) pp. 142–145. A description of auditing instruments that ensure that the school has a balanced, school-wide approach to the teaching of literacy and multimodal texts is provided in Chapter 6 of Anstey and Bull (2006) and Chapter 6 of Bull and Anstey (2010).


References

Anstey, M & Bull, G 2006, Teaching and Learning Multiliteracies: Changing times changing literacies International Reading Association, Newark, Delaware, (available through Education Services Australia).

Anstey, M & Bull, G 2009, Using Multimodal Texts and Digital Resources in a Multiliterate Classroom e:update 004, e:lit: Primary English Teaching Association, Marrickville, pp. 1–8.

Bull, G & Anstey, M 2010 a, Evolving Pedagogies; Reading and Writing in a Multimodal World, Education Services Australia, Melbourne.

Bull, G & Anstey, M 2010 b, ‘Using the Principles of Multiliteracies to inform Pedagogical Change’, Chapter Eight in Cole, DR & Pullen, DL Multiliteracies in Motion,  pp. 141–159  Taylor and Francis, London.

Calabrese, RL 2002, The Leadership Assignment: Creating Change, Allyn and Bacon, Boston.

Fullan, M 2001, Leading in a Culture of Change, Wiley, San Francisco.

Hargreaves, A 1994, Changing teachers Changing Times: teachers work and culture in the postmodern age, Teachers College Press, New York.

Hargreaves, A & Fullan, M eds. 2008, Change Wars, Solution Tree Press, Bloomington.

The Australian Curriculum: English Draft Version 1.0.1 available at www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/Documents/English%20curriculum.pdf

T_h_e_ _H_o_n_ _L_i_n_d_s_a_y_ _T_a_n_n_e_r_ _v_i_c_e_-_c_h_a_n_c_e_l_l_o_r_’s_ _f_e_l_l_o_w_ _V_i_c_t_o_r_i_a_ _U_n_i_v_e_r_s_i_t_y_ _

T_u_e_s_d_a_y_ _2_5_ _O_c_t_o_b_e_r_ _2_0_1_1_ _

L_E_C_T_U_R_E_ _S_E_R_I_E_S_ _

C_h_a_n_c_e_l_l_o_r_’s_ _L_e_c_t_u_r_e_ _S_e_r_i_e_s_ _T_h_e_ _H_o_n_ _L_i_n_d_s_a_y_ _T_a_n_n_e_r_ _T_u_e_s_d_a_y_ _2_5_ _O_c_t_o_b_e_r_ _2_0_1_1_ _

UNI 2.0: WILL THE INTERNET KILL UNIVERSITIES?

Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates recently described universities as an endangered species. The university’s traditional role as creator, curator and distributor of knowledge is under direct threat from the internet. This is a profound challenge for an institution that pre-dates almost all others in western civilization. The digital revolution is transforming almost every aspect of human existence. Will the internet kill universities?

If universities don’t adapt, they will die. When information technologies change, even the most entrenched institutions can be overturned. The invention of printing around 1450 was a vital precursor to the Reformation. Not only did printing enable mass circulation of subversive doctrines: the medium itself challenged traditional authority and hierarchy.

Individual universities like Stanford have incubated many of the new ideas and innovators that are driving the digital revolution. Yet as institutions, universities are struggling to adapt to the dynamics of the new world.

Universities are information businesses. When the way we handle information changes fundamentally, information businesses must change.

We’re living through one of the most extraordinary transformations in human history. More recent digital innovations, loosely grouped under the Web 2.0 label, are unleashing possibilities of interactivity, collaboration and creativity that were previously unimaginable. Gatekeepers and intermediaries are under siege as a digital tidal wave of disaggregation sweeps through existing structures. As Finance Minister I developed a Government 2.0 strategy to address these

challenges

Integrating Multimodal Composition into Classroom Practice (Multimedia Assignments)

Why encourage multimodal composition?

Multimodal/Multimedia composition is another means through which a teacher can encourage students to think strategically about how to express and represent their ideas. Students may be able to use multimedia to help them to synthesize and present their own knowledge. Also, it may allow students to use higher-order thinking skills and acquire skills that can be transferred to other areas of academia such as writing. Multimedia may facilitate project-based learning by enhancing the students’ interest, higher-order thinking skills and by supporting information gathering and presentation, all of which are needed to produce a well-written composition. Also, it has been shown that multimedia projects that require active participation and engagement in authentic problem solving are considered to have great potential to enhance students’ motivation and learning (Carver et al., 1992; Hay et al., 1994; Jonassen, 1998; Lehrer, 1993; Lehrer et al., 1994; Liu, 1998; Liu & Hsiao; 2002; Liu & Pedersen, 1998; Liu & Rutledge, 1997).

Students are living in a world that is increasingly non-print, non-linear, and multimedia centric. New media such as smartphones, tablets, social networking (Facebook & Twitter), web 2.0, video, blogs, etc. are transforming the communication experiences of students. Outside of school, students are composing in nonprint (or multi) media that include combinations of video, graphics, text, and sound; all of which are frequently written and read in a nonlinear fashion.  However, in school, students are rarely asked to utilize these same non-linear and multimedia forms of communication. Students need to develop 21st century literacies for their ongoing education and future careers, and these literacies include multimedia literacy. According to the National Council of Teachers of English’s Definition of 21st Century Literacies:


[1] Wikipedia: Digital literacy is the ability to effectively and critically navigate, evaluate and create information using a range of digital technologies. It requires one “to recognize and use that power, to manipulate and transform digital media, to distribute pervasively, and to easily adapt them to new forms”.[1] Digital literacy does not replace traditional forms of literacy, it builds upon the foundation of traditional forms of literacy.[2] Digital literacy is the marrying of the two terms digital and literacy, however, it is much more than a combination of the two terms. Digital information is a symbolic representation of data, and literacy refers to the ability to read for knowledge, write coherently, and think critically about the written word.Research around digital literacy is concerned with wider aspects associated with learning how to effectively find, use, summarize, evaluate, create, and communicate information while using digital technologies; not just being literate at using a computer.Digital literacy encompasses all digital devices, such as computer hardware, software, the Internet, and cell phones. A person using these skills to interact with society may be called a digital citizen.

[2] Dr Stanley Frielick, AUT Center for Learning and Teaching

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Bringing language research into the classroom

lesley kaiser

AUT University ipad/iphone project GD CoP & MOBCOP

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ipads/iphones in tertiary Graphics teaching AUT University

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